Online Publishers And Broadcasters Are Now Bigger Than Newspapers

Adapted from the original article at Harvard’s NeimanLab

There are now more Americans working for online publishers and broadcasters than for newspapers, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employment at online outlets first eclipsed newspapers in October 2015. As of March, there were 197,800 Americans working in the “internet publishing and broadcasting” sector versus 183,200 people working for U.S. newspapers.

Newspaper employment was at 457,800 people in June of 1990, the earliest data offered by BLS. The number of newspaper jobs has fallen consistently since then. Digital publishing, meanwhile, has grown considerably.

It’s safe to assume that newspaper jobs will continue to evaporate. Most papers are struggling to find new revenue as print advertising and circulation decline and online advertising fails to make up the difference.

Even large national newspapers, such as The New York Times, are still figuring out to adapt as the internet age. The Times has more than 1 million digital-only subscribers, and it has goals to reach $800 million in digital revenue by 2020, but the newspaper is in negotiations with its unions to layoff at least 200 newsroom staff later this year.

Many are also questioning the sustainability of online-only business models as well. Some news outlets have reported this spring that BuzzFeed cut its 2016 revenue projections in half after it missed its 2015 goals (BuzzFeed disputes the specific totals). Mashable cut 30 jobs in April and has dealt with an exodus of a number of other journalists after it decided to shift its focus toward video. While newspaper job losses have been the steepest, other sectors have also seen decreases in job numbers. Employment at periodicals fell 37 percent from a peak of 150,100 in December 1990 to 93,600 in March.

Radio broadcasting jobs fell from January 1990 to March 2016 by about 27 percent. As of March, there were 130,400 Americans working in television broadcasting.

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